How To Setup FTP Server On openSUSE 42.1

opensuse_42.1

Setup FTP server on openSUSE

vsftpd (Very Secure File Transport Protocol Daemon) is a secure, fast FTP server for Unix/Linux systems. It is licensed under GPL, and it is the default FTP server for CentOS, Fedora, RHEL, Ubuntu, Slackware, and NimbleX.

This tutorial will describe how to install and configure a basic simple FTP server on openSUSE 42.1 using vsftpd. This method described in this tutorial is same for older openSUSE versions such as 13.2, 13.1 etc.

Install vsftpd

Enter the following the following command to install vsftpd package.

sudo zypper in vsftpd

Start vsftpd service, and enable it to start automatically on every reboot.

sudo systemctl start vsftpd
sudo systemctl enable vsftpd

Configure vsftpd

Create a folder for ftp users.

Note: In openSUSE 42.1, this directory will be created automatically after installing VSFTPD package.

sudo mkdir /srv/ftp

Create a group called ftp-users.

sudo groupadd ftp-users

Create a sample user called unixmen with home directory /srv/ftp/, and assign the user to ftp-users group.

sudo useradd -g ftp-users -d /srv/ftp/ unixmen

Set password for the new user.

sudo passwd unixmen

Make the ftp home directory /srv/ftp/ accessible by ftp users.

sudo chmod 750 /srv/ftp/
sudo chown unixmen:ftp-users /srv/ftp/

Edit file vsftpd.conf,

sudo nano /etc/vsftpd.conf

Make the changes as shown below.

[...]
# Uncomment and  Set YES to enable write.
write_enable=YES
[...]
# Uncomment and Set banner name for your website
ftpd_banner=Welcome to Unixmen FTP Server.
[...]
# Uncomment
ls_recurse_enable=YES
[...]
# Uncomment and set YES to allow local users to log in.
local_enable=YES
[...]
# To disable anonymous access, set NO.
anonymous_enable=NO
[...]
# Uncomment to enable ascii download and upload.
ascii_upload_enable=YES
ascii_download_enable=YES
[...]
## Add at the end of this  file ##
use_localtime=YES

Save and exit file.

Restart vsftpd service to take effect the changes.

sudo systemctl restart vsftpd

Test FTP Server in the local system itself

First let us try to login to our FTP server as shown below.

ftp localhost

Sample Output:

Trying ::1:21 ...
Connected to localhost.
220 Welcome to Unixmen FTP Server.
Name (localhost:skopensuse): ## Press Enter
331 Please specify the password.
Password: ## Enter password for the user 'skopensuse'
230 Login successful.
Remote system type is UNIX.
Using binary mode to transfer files.
ftp>

Here ‘skopensuse’ is my local system user name. As you see in the above output, we will be able to login to ftp server using the local user. Type quit to exit from ftp console.

If you want to login as a FTP user which we created (Ex.unixmen in our case), you need to enter the username in the FTP login prompt. Refer the following output.

ftp localhost

Sample output:

Trying ::1:21 ...
Connected to localhost.
220 Welcome to Unixmen FTP Server.
Name (localhost:skopensuse): unixmen ## Enter FTP username
331 Please specify the password.
Password: ## Enter password of the user 'unixmen'.
230 Login successful.
Remote system type is UNIX.
Using binary mode to transfer files.
ftp>

As you see in the above example, I have logged-in to the FTP server with user name ‘unixmen’.

Test FTP Server from a remote system

By default, openSUSE built-in firewall won’t allow to login to FTP from remote systems. So let us allow vsftpd service through suse firewall. To do that go to Yast -> Security and Users -> Firewall.

YaST-Control-Center-@-linux.site_001

In the Firewall section, go to Allowed Services. In the zone selection drop down box, select External Zone and in Service to Allow drop-down box, select vsftpd server and click add.

YaST2_002

Click Next, and close Yast Control center.

Now, try to connect from a remote system.

In my case, I tried from my Ubuntu desktop.

ftp 192.168.1.102

Sample output:

Connected to 192.168.1.102.
220 Welcome to Unixmen FTP Server.
Name (192.168.1.102:sk): unixmen ## FTP username
331 Please specify the password.
Password:
230 Login successful.
Remote system type is UNIX.
Using binary mode to transfer files.
ftp>

As you see in the above output, I will be able to connect to FTP server. If you didn’t allow the vsftpd service through firewall, you may get a Connection timed out error.

Connect from Browser

Open up your browser and Navigate to ftp://ip-address/. Enter the ftp user name and password.

ftp:–192.168.1.102 – Google Chrome_002

That’s it. Now you’ll be able to access the user’s FTP directory.

Index of – – Google Chrome_003

Connect to FTP server using FileZilla

Working from command-line mode might be bit difficult to newbies. So let us install a graphical FTP client called Filezilla to make things much easier.

Mostly, fileZilla is available on almost all Linux distributions default repositories.

On Debian/Ubuntu based systems:

sudo apt-get install filezilla

On Fedora/Redhat/CentOS systems:

sudo yum install filezilla

On openSUSE/SUSE:

sudo zypper in filezilla

After installing filezilla, open it, and enter the ftp server IP address, user name and password and click quickconnect.

FileZilla_004

That’s it. You can now access the FTP home directory of the user ‘unixmen’.

unixmen@192.168.1.102 – FileZilla_005

Restrict particular users to access the FTP server

For added security, you can restrict FTP access to certain users by adding them to /etc/vsftpd.chroot_list file.

To do that, Edit vsftpd.conf file,

sudo nano /etc/vsftpd.conf

Make the changes as shown below.

[...]
# Uncomment and set YES
chroot_local_user=YES
chroot_list_enable=YES
chroot_list_file=/etc/vsftpd.chroot_list
[...]

Save and close file.

Then, Create a new file /etc/vsftpd.chroot_list,

sudo nano /etc/vsftpd.chroot_list

Add the users that you want to give access to FTP server. I added the user called unixmen.

unixmen

Restart ftp service.

sudo systemctl restart vsftpd

Now you will be able to connect to FTP server with users in the chroot list file.

If you try to connect to FTP server with users other than in the chroot list, you may get the following error:

500 OOPS: could not read chroot() list file:/etc/vsftpd.chroot_list
ftp: Login failed

That’s it. Your FTP server is ready to use.

Configuring Vsftpd With SSL/TLS

After installing vsftpd on openSUSE server, create the following directory if it’s not created already to store SSL certificates.

sudo mkdir /etc/ssl/private

Then, create the certificate and key files using the following command:

sudo openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:1024 -keyout /etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.pem -out /etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.pem

You’ll be asked to enter the series of questions such as Country, State Code, Email address, Organization name etc. Enter the details one by one. Here is my sample output:

 Generating a 1024 bit RSA private key
 ......++++++
 .............++++++
 writing new private key to '/etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.pem'
 -----
 You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated
 into your certificate request.
 What you are about to enter is what is called a Distinguished Name or a DN.
 There are quite a few fields but you can leave some blank
 For some fields there will be a default value,
 If you enter '.', the field will be left blank.
 -----
 Country Name (2 letter code) [XX]:IN
 State or Province Name (full name) []:TN
 Locality Name (eg, city) [Default City]:Erode
 Organization Name (eg, company) [Default Company Ltd]:Unixmen
 Organizational Unit Name (eg, section) []:Technical
 Common Name (eg, your name or your server's hostname) []:linux.suse
 Email Address []:[email protected]

In the common name field, you can either use hostname or IP address of your vsftpd server.

Edit vsftpd configuration file /etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf,

sudo vi /etc/vsftpd.conf

Add the following lines at the end:

ssl_enable=YES
allow_anon_ssl=NO
force_local_data_ssl=YES
force_local_logins_ssl=YES

ssl_tlsv1=YES
ssl_sslv2=NO
ssl_sslv3=NO

rsa_cert_file=/etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.pem
rsa_private_key_file=/etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.pem

Save and close the file. Restart vsftpd service.

sudo systemctl restart vsftpd

Check FTP Server

Open Filezilla from your client system. Go to File -> Site Manager.

In the Site Manager window, select New Site.

Site Manager_001

Name your new site, or leave it as it is. In my case I name it as My local FTP. Enter the FTP server IP address, and select“Require explicit FTP over TLS” from the Encryption drop down box. In the Logon Type drop downbox, select Ask for password option, and enter your FTP user name(Here unixmen is my FTP username). Finally click on the Connect button.

Site Manager_002

You’ll be asked to enter the ftp user password in the next screen.

Enter password_003

Note: In case you got error something like below.

Response: 500 OOPS: child died
Error: Critical error
Error: Could not connect to server

Edit /etc/vsftpd.conf file:

sudo nano /etc/vsftpd.conf

Uncomment or add the following line:

seccomp_sandbox=NO

Then restart vsftpd service to take effect the changes.

sudo systemctl restart vsftpd

Then again go to the Site Manager, Enter the FTP server IP address, and select“Require explicit FTP over TLS” from the Encryption drop down box. In the Logon Type drop downbox, select Ask for password option, and enter your FTP user name. Finally click on the Connect button.

Now, you”ll be asked to accept the certificate that is being used to make sure the server can be trusted. In the Certificate window, you may see the list of values which is entered during the certificate generation process. Click Ok to accept the certificate and establish the connection.

Unknown certificate_005

That’s it. Now you’ll be able to access your FTP server.

My local FTP – ftpes:–unixmen@192.168.1.102 – FileZilla_006

That’s it. We have configured out FTP server with SSL/TLS.

Cheers!

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  • Martial Tchuente

    Well written article. Now I have my FTP server configured on Opensuse Leap 42.1. Thanks a lot for sharing this.