Install Corosync and Pacemaker On CentOS 6.5

by
Share this Article: Facebook0Google+0Twitter7LinkedIn0Reddit0StumbleUpon1

I will show you in this tutorial how to install your first cluster Corosync and the Linux Cluster Manager Pacemaker.

Let me give small definitions about Corosync and Pacemaker.

The Corosync Cluster Engine is an open source project licensed under the new BSD License derived from the OpenAIS project. The mission of the Corosync effort is to develop, release, and support a community-defined, open source cluster executive for use by multiple open source and commercial cluster projects or products.

Pacemaker is open source high availability resource manager software used on computer clusters since 2004. Until about 2007, it was part of the Linux-HA project, then was split out to be its own project.

CRM Shell is a software to manage pacemaker resources.

Server:

node1: Centos 6.5   IP= 192.168.1.110
node2:  Centos 6.5  IP=192.168.1.111
Selinux=Permissive
Iptables add ports:  (5404-5405)

add node1 and node2 to your /etc/hosts file.

Add the HA  Clustering Repo to your Linux Centos nodes

vi /etc/yum.repos.d/ha-clustering.repo

add

[haclustering]
name=HA Clustering
baseurl=http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/network:/ha-clustering:/Stable/CentOS_CentOS-6/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0

Install the package on both nodes (node1 and node2):

 yum install pacemaker corosync crmsh

If  you have any dependencies issues about /sbin/xfs . please install it from here:

rpm -ivh http://mirror.centos.org/centos/5/centosplus/i386/RPMS/xfsprogs-2.9.4-1.el5.centos.i386.rpm

Use this Configuration and edit your IP adresses:

/etc/corosync/corosync.conf

compatibility: whitetank

aisexec {
    # Run as root - this is necessary to be able to manage resources with Pacemaker
    user: root
    group: root
}

service {
    # Load the Pacemaker Cluster Resource Manager
    ver: 1
    name: pacemaker
    use_mgmtd: no
    use_logd: no
}

totem {
    version: 2
    #How long before declaring a token lost (ms)
        token: 5000
    # How many token retransmits before forming a new configuration
        token_retransmits_before_loss_const: 10
    # How long to wait for join messages in the membership protocol (ms)
        join: 1000
    # How long to wait for consensus to be achieved before starting a new
    # round of membership configuration (ms)
        consensus: 7500
    # Turn off the virtual synchrony filter
        vsftype: none
    # Number of messages that may be sent by one processor on receipt of the token
        max_messages: 20
    # Stagger sending the node join messages by 1..send_join ms
        send_join: 45
    # Limit generated nodeids to 31-bits (positive signed integers)
        clear_node_high_bit: yes
    # Disable encryption
        secauth: off
    # How many threads to use for encryption/decryption
        threads: 0
    # Optionally assign a fixed node id (integer)
    # nodeid: 1234interface {
interface {
         ringnumber: 0  
        member {
            memberaddr: 192.168.1.110
        }
        member {
            memberaddr: 192.168.1.111
        }
bindnetaddr: 192.168.1.0  (netwokip)
                mcastaddr: 226.94.1.1
                mcastport: 5405
                ttl: 1
        }
    }

logging {
    fileline: off
    to_stderr: no
    to_logfile: yes
    to_syslog: yes
    logfile: /var/log/cluster/corosync.log
    debug: off
    timestamp: on

logger_subsys {
    subsys: AMF
    debug: off
    }
}

amf {
    mode: disabled
}

Generate corosync Authentication key with :

The key will be generated to /etc/corosync/

 [root@node1 ~]# corosync-keygen
 Corosync Cluster Engine Authentication key generator.
 Gathering 1024 bits for key from /dev/random.
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy.
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 64).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 128).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 192).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 256).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 320).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 392).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 456).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 520).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 592).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 656).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 728).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 800).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 864).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 928).
 Press keys on your keyboard to generate entropy (bits = 992).
 Writing corosync key to /etc/corosync/authkey.
 [root@node1 ~]#
scp /etc/corosync/*  root@node2:/etc/corosync/

Edit on node2 /etc/corosync/corosync.conf  with the node2 IP address

Start corosync and pacemaker on both machines.

service corosync start
Starting Corosync Cluster Engine (corosync):               OK  ]
service pacemaker  start
Starting Pacemaker Cluster Manager                         OK  ]

Check Linux Cluster Status:

# crm status
Last updated: Thu Mar  6 04:58:10 2014
Last change: Wed Mar  5 15:22:54 2014 via crmd on node1
Stack: classic openais (with plugin)
Current DC: node2 - partition with quorum
Version: 1.1.10-14.el6_5.2-368c726
2 Nodes configured, 2 expected votes
0 Resources configured

Online: [ node1 node2 ]

For questions please refer to our Q/A forum at : http://ask.unixmen.com/


Share this Article: Facebook0Google+0Twitter7LinkedIn0Reddit0StumbleUpon0